- Civil and Building Materials 2019

ICCBM 2019: The 3rd International Conference on Civil and Building Materials 2019 | KEM - EI, SCOPUS etc

Merlion Park

The body symbolises Singapore's humble beginnings as a fishing village when it was called Temasek, meaning 'sea town' in Old Javanese.Its head represents Singapore’s original name, Singapura, or ‘lion city’ in Malay.Today, you can glimpse this legend at Merlion Park. Spouting water from its mouth, the Merlion statue stands tall at 8.6 metres and weighs 70 tonnes.This icon is a ‘must-see’ for tourists visiting Singapore, similar to other significant landmarks around the world.Built by local craftsman Lim Nang Seng, it was unveiled on 15 September 1972 by then Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew at the mouth of the Singapore River, to welcome all visitors to Singapore.

Gardens by the Bay

Located next to Marina Reservoir, Gardens by the Bay offers breath-taking waterfront views. This multi-award winning horticultural destination spans 101 hectares of reclaimed land, and is made up of two main areas – Bay South Garden and Bay East Garden.At the Cloud Forest, a 35-metre tall mountain is veiled in mist and covered in lush vegetation amidst the world’s tallest indoor waterfall.Bay South Garden is the largest of the gardens. Inspired by an orchid, the design resembles Singapore’s national flower, Vanda 'Miss Joaquim’. You can’t miss the massive Supertrees here. These tree-shaped vertical gardens are between nine to 16 storeys tall. Walk on the suspended walkway between two Supertrees to enjoy a bird’s eye view of the gardens. In the evening, catch the sky show of choreographed lights and sounds at the Garden Rhapsody amidst the Supertrees.Head to Bay East Garden for the perfect picnic setting with lush lawns and tropical palm trees. From the waterfront promenade, you will see a picturesque view of the city skyline.

Little India



Little India today is one of Singapore’s most vibrant districts. As you walk down Serangoon Road and neighbouring streets, explore their mix of Hindu and Chinese temples, mosques and churches.Fill your tummy with South Indian vegetarian food, North Indian tandoori dishes and local fare like roti prata(round pancakes) and teh tarik (pulled tea in Malay). Try to spot the brewers ‘pull’ the hot milk tea – it’s amazing showmanship.Don’t forget to shop. The 24-hour shopping mall Mustafa Centre offers everything from electronics to groceries, or take your pick from open-air Tekka Centre, goldsmith shops and sari stores.With its close proximity to the city and a bohemian vibe, many artists also call Little India home.Do visit during Deepavali(usually October or November) and Pongal (mid-January) – the joyous celebrations are wonderful to observe.

Chinatown

The cramped five-foot-ways, dingy alleys and raucous street hawkers are relics of Chinatown’s past.Yet pockets of history remain in Chinatown, along with more modern sights. You could easily spend a few days wandering through these still-narrow streets.Family-run goldsmiths, medicinal halls and teahouses ply their trades next to sleeker neighbours such as hipster bars and lifestyle shops.If you’re a foodie, try 'char kway teow' (stir-fried noodles) and 'satay' (barbecued meat skewers) at Chinatown Food Street, a row of hawker stalls, shophouse restaurants and kiosks along Smith Street.For trendier tastes, chic restaurants and bars are in Neil Road, Duxton Road and Keong Saik Road. The vibe is electric in Club Street and Ann Siang Road on Friday and Saturday nights, when locals and expats head down for dinner and drinks.

Clarke Quay

 

Clarke Quayis a historical riverside quay in Singapore, located within the Singapore River Planning Area. The quay is situated upstream from the mouth of the Singapore River and Boat Quay.At present, five blocks of restored warehouses house various restaurants and nightclubs. There are also moored Chinese junks(tongkangs) that have been refurbished into floating pubs and restaurants. The Cannery is one of the anchor tenants of the place. There are over 5 different concepts in one block. Another anchor tenant, The Arena, will be home to Singapore's First Permanent Illusion Show (starting August 2008) starring J C Sum and 'Magic Babe' Ning.The G-MAX reverse bungee, the first in Singapore, is located at the entrance which opened in November 2003. Notable restaurants and nightclubs include Hooters and Indochine.River cruises and river taxis on the Singapore River can be accessed from Clarke Quay. One of its most popular attractions is its exciting host of CQ's signature events happening once every quarter. Clark Quay has become known as a hub of Singaporean nightclubs including Zirca, and up until 2008, theMinistry of Sound.